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ZYMIN

2. Sterile dried veast, mixed with sugar and water it is used as an application for fluor albus of gonorrheal origin.

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ZAUSCHNERIA

(Californian * Fuchsia. Nat. Ord. Onagraceae). There is only one species of this genus. It requires a warm, dry position in sandy loam fully exposed to the sun, and is propagated by division of the roots in spring. Z. caltfornica (Humming-Birds Trumpet).This has branching stems and hoary leaves. Flowers brilliant vermilion. Site sunny. Soil sandy, well-drained loam. Flowering Period, August to September. Height, I ft. The variety mexicana has less hoary leaves. It produces vivid scarlet flowers earlier than the species, namely, in July.

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ZEA

(Nat. Ord. Gramineae). This is an unimportant genus of annuals the hardiness of which is doubtful. The best known species, grown at times in the borders but chiefly in the kitchen garden, is Zea Mays, popularly known by various names, such as Guinea Wheat, Indian Corn, Indian Sugar Corn, Maize, Mealies, Sweet Corn, and Turkey Wheat. Its culture is described in our article on Maize, or Indian Sugar Corn.

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ZEPHYRANTHES

(Atmasco Lily. Nat. Ord. Amaryllidaceae).This is a very ornamental early summer flowering pot plant, requiring ordinary greenhouse treatment and of easy culture. It is propagated by offsets, and should , be potted in sandy loam, peat, and leaf-mould. Temperature required, 40-50 degrees F. Greenhouse Species vZephyranthes Atamasco.Pure white. Flowers in Mav. Height, i ft. Z. cannata.Deika.teio5e. Flowers in May. Height, i ft.Z. flava.Pale golden – yellow. Flowers in May. Height, i ft.

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ZINC COMPOUNDS

Very little is known of the horticultural value of the compounds of Zinc, though suggestions have been made to use such as Zinc Arsenide and Zinc Sulphate as fungicides. One point of importance to gardeners is that Zinc Sulphide is a white compound instead of a black one, as is Lead Sulphide. Thus when the greenhouses are syringed with Liver of Sulphur, no ugly blackening of paint results if Zinc is used instead of Lead when making the paint. We understand that Zinc Paint can be obtained without much difficulty, for after all it is only a matter of substituting Zinc Carbonate, or Zinc White as it is popularly called, in place of Lead Carbonate. Zinc Paint should be universally adopted by gardeners, since Liver of Sulphur cannot be done without, and then there will be no more complaints of spoiling the appearance of the houses by spraying to check diseases.E. T. E.

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ZINNIA

(Nat. Ord. Compositse). This is an interesting genus consisting chiefly of half-hardy annuals some of which are particularly handsome when in bloom, and very valuable in gardens when the autumn is fine and warm. All the kinds mentioned below should be treated as half-hardy annuals and raised in gentle heat in spring. They require liberal treatment at all times to develop their beauty to the fullest extent, but a warm and sunny position is equally essential from the time they are planted out in early June. They are very showy and give a wide range of harmonious colouring from almost white and fawn, through pink, yellow, and scarlet to crimson and purplish-red. Zinnia elegans.This is the most popular species of all both for border displays and as an exhibition flower. It is available in varied colour forms, flowers in the late summer and autumn, and averages 1J-2J ft. in height. Z. haageana.This bears orangeyellow flowers from August to September, and grows ij ft. high. Z. pauciflora.This is a red, autumn-flowered species, about 2 ft. high. Z. tenuiflora.This seedsmans name probably indicates a variety of Z. pauciflora.C. H. C.

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ZYGADENUS

(Nat. Ord. Liliaces). This is a comparatively unknown but pretty genus of hardy herbaceous plants useful for the shady and moister parts of the herbaceous border. They will flower freely under these conditions if a little peat is added to the soil. They may be propagated by seeds sown in the usual way for hardy perennials, or by division of the rootstocks in November or March, at which times also they are most successfully planted. A large number of sorts have been described, but only five of them are grown. Four of these we briefly describe below : Zygadenus elegans (Syn. Helonias glaberrima).A white sort blooming from May onwards, and growing 12 ins. high. Z. glaberrimus.A species producing creamy-white flowers about midsummer, and growing 12 ins. high. Z. muscitoxicum (Syns. Amianthimum muscitoxicum and Helonias laeta).This, popularly known as Fly Poison, bears white flowers in June, and averages ij ft. high. Z. Nuttallii.This also bears white flowers in June, and grows about 18 ins. high.

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