Archive | O RSS feed for this section

OXIMES

A series of bodies obtained from aldehydes and ketones by condensation of the carbonyl group with the compound hydroxylamine.

Comments are closed

OENANTHIC ETHER

A mobile liquid substance used in the preparation of artificial cognac and for flavouring wines; made from oenanthic acid and ethyl alcohol by the action of sulphuric acid, and propared commercially from the oxidized products of oil of rue. It is stated to be a mixture of capric and caprylic acids, has a strong vinous odour, and is readily soluble in alcohol and ether. Many fusel oils contain these acids, and some Hungarian wines are known to contain amyl caprate.

Comments are closed

OXALATES

Compounds of oxalic acid with metals and bases. The alkaline oxalates are soluble in water, but the others are for the most part insoluble.

Comments are closed

ORRIS OIL

A yellowish, semisolid, fatty substance distilled from the rliizome of Iris Florentina, containing myristic acid, oleic acid, and some esters. It melts at 44 degrees to 50 degrees C., is soluble in alcohol and ether, and is used in making perfumes and cosmetics. I>one, a methyl ketone, is the odoriferous principle of the iris root, and probably that of the violet also. Irone is, in fact, the basic source of several compounds used for the manufacture of violet essence.

Comments are closed

OXIDES

See Bases, Chemical Compounds,p. 101, and Oxygen.

Comments are closed

OLEIN

The glyceride of oleic acid, being an oby body found present in many natural fats, and which yields oleic arid and glycerine upon hydrolysis.

Comments are closed

OLEIC ACID

in combination with glycerine is contained in most fats and fixed uils, particularly the latter, and when pure is a tasteless, odourless, crystalline body, of sp. gr. 08908, which melts at 140 C., and is very soluble in alcohol and ether. It absorbs oxygen from the air and turns yellow upon exposure. Upon saponification with alkalies it yields combinations in the nature of soft soap. The natural oils containing olein belong to the “nondrying” classthat is to say, they do not thicken, and more or less dry up upon exposure to the Nitrous acid converts oleic acid into a solid stereoisomeric modification known as elafdic acid.

Comments are closed

OXAMIDE

Awhite crystalline substance, being the normal amide of oxalic acid.

Comments are closed

OXYHAEMOGLOBIN

The compound formed in the blood by the action of inspired oxygen on its haemoglobin constituent, which carries oxygen to the animal tissues.

Comments are closed

OLIVE OIL

An oil expressed from the fruit of the olivetree, extensively grown in Southern Europe, and of great value as a food and for the manufacture of certain kinds of soaps. The pure oil is of a pale yellow or greenishyellow colour and agreeable taste, has a sp. gr. of 0916 to 0918, a saponification value of 185 to 196, and an iodine value of 79 to 93. It contains about 75 per cent, of glycerides. It has recently been ascertained that when olive oil is heated with mannitol in the presence of a small amount of sodium ethylate the glycerol can be replaced by it, and the product is far superior in all respects to the original olive oil as a food fat.

Comments are closed