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LENTILS

This is an unimportant genus of hardy or nearly hardy perennials, tuberous or rhizomatous. The best known species is probably L. Leontopeialum, popularly known as Lions Leaf, a yellow April blooming plant about 9 ins. high.

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LIGtJLARIA

As already remarked in our article on Levisti- CUM, this last-named genus was once united with the one now under notice, but at the present time is considered distinct from it. Both have the same English name, both are hardy herbaceous perennials, and both are similar in action. As a medicinal plant Lovage has, however, declined ; it was once used for a large variety of purposes and obtained considerable popularity as a diuretic. Now, however. Parsley PiERT (see article on Medicinal Herbs) seems to have superseded it. A number of species are grown, such as L. actaeijolium, L. mucronatum, L. pyrenaicum, and L. Thomsoni. The most popular species is probably L. scoticum, the Scotch Lovage, a pink summer blooming plant about i yd. high, of which a white form is also available.

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LIZARD ORCHIS (Orchis Urcina)

This is a genus which may well be dispensed with except in the largest collections. It contains many hardy and half-hardy annuals, as well as some half-hardy biennials and halfhardy shrubs, some of a trailing and climbing habit. Most of the plants have very poisonous properties, and sting the flesh violently when touched. Probably the best known species is L. lateritia, the Chili Nettle, a half-hardy red, May flowering climber, averaging 12 ft. or more in height.

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LYCOPUS (Gipsy Wort Nat Ord Labiatae)

This is an unimportant genus of hardy grasses in this country, but abroad, notably in the Southern Peninsula, it is of great importance for basket work and other similar purposes. Of easy culture, itthrives in ordinary light, sandy soil, and is easily propagated in the usual way by root division. The best known species is L. Spartum, popularly known as Cord Grass, which grows about z. ft. in height.

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