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JONQUILLA

These are not as much grown now as formerly, but are worthy of inclusion in the garden or greenhouse for the dual reason of the loveliness of their flowers and for the pleasantness of the scent they give. Culture.This is quite simple. Outside the bulbs should be planted about three times their own depth in soilj preferably in groups. They may be used for naturalising, and may be planted in the rock garden or rock border as well as in the flower borders. Indoors four should be set in each 5-inch pot, using light loamy soil, and giving plenty of water when the flowers open. Varieties.No special variety or varieties can be recommended here. The plants bear yellow flowers in the spring-time, and average 9 ins. in height.(For the flower known as Queen Annes Double Jonquil and the Small Jonquil see Narcissus Odorus in Narcissus Species.Editor.)

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JULIDiE-

Most of the Rushes are too coarse for the water garden proper, but may be used for planting on stream or river sides, or, again, in the wetter and more marshy portions of the wild garden where they will thrive with very little attentions The genus is a large one, and as the plants are of but little value we do not propose to describe the species here, but merely to name the kinds most often grown. These are the Toad Rush (/. bufonius) ; the Candle Rush (/. effusus, and its varieties conglomeratus and spiralis) ; the Common Hard Rush (J.glaucus) used for basket making ; and the Moss Rush (/. squarrosus).

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JUNCUS (Rush Nat Ord Juncaceae)

A name applied to the genus Amel- ANCHIER, more especially to A. canadensis. See Shrubs.

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JUPITERS DISTAFF (Salvia glutinosa)

This is also known as the Caffre Lily, Crimson Flag, or Winter Gladiolus, is a hardy rhizomatousrooted plant introduced into British gardens in 1869. It has sword-like foliage, and bears on slender stems, averaging 1J-2J ft. high, numerous bright crimson saucer-shaped flowers in October and early November. These spikes are excellent for cutting, the unopened buds expanding in water like those of the Gladiolus. It is hardy except in cold damp soils and exposed localities. Culture.To be seen at its best it should be grown in clumps in a warm, rich, well-drained soil ; but not in one which is hot and dry, and a top-dressing of leaf-mould after the flowers are over will greatly benefit the plants. The bulbs may be planted any time between September and March. The Kaffir Lily may be grown in pots in light rich soil. After potting in March, the pots are best plunged in the ground all summer and only brought into a greenhouse in late September or early October, when the flower spikes are appearing. Frequent watering is necessary, also repotting in March or April, when severe frosts have gone, after which the pots should be again plunged for the summer in the open ground. J. J. & E. T. E.

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JAPANESE CUCUMBERS,

Interesting adaptations of the Japanese style of gardening are often to be seen nowadays. In the Land of the Rising Sun the laying out of a garden is controlled by certain fixed laws which are only partially understood by Westerners. Still, some delightful effects can be secured by following the leading rules on which the Japanese gardener works. A Japanese garden makes a strong appeal to the amateur on account of the fact that it can be developed on a very small plot of ground. In planning, one of the most important points is to consider the effect of the garden as a whole, very plant, and each piece of rockwork, must be thought of in its relation to the general scheme. All parts of the garden must be true to their particular characters. Any elevations, such as may exist or be built up, will be suggestive of mountainous country, and the plants must be in keeping with the idea. Dwarf or stunted trees and shrubs give a windswept appearance, and are well adapted to the hilly parts of the garden. Low, flat areas of ground give the impression of pasture, and should be planted with subjects having a free habit of growth. No Japanese garden is complete without water. This may be in the form of quite a tiny pool, but if a stiff outline is avoided the pond will be one of the most attractive features. On the banks of the water moistureloving plants can be allowed a freedom of growth that is natural in such situations. If possible the placing of a small island in the pool is to be recommended. Where the water can be narrowed down to give the effect of a stream, a bridge might be introduced. In situations where there is a natural supply of water more ambitious schemes may be attempted. Native Japanese plants should predominate in the garden. Especially suitable are the spring flowering trees so widely used in the East, such as the almond, cherry, crab-apple, etc. These will usher in the spring with a wonderful wealth of blossom. Azaleas are useful for giving fine splashes of colour in the early summer, whilst wistaria should be freely used for training over pergolas. Japanese Irises should of course be made a great feature of in the garden, and a selection of chrysanthemums will give a good efiect in the fall. A useful small tree is the Japanese Maple, of which there are numerous varieties. Most of these provide splendid autumn, tints just when there is a need of colour. Other interesting plants which are very suitable for, if not inseparable from, Japanese gardens include Anemone japnnica, Forsythia suspensa, Japanese Heaths, Japanese Lilies, Paeonies, Physalis Alkekengi, Primula japonica, and Tricyrtis hirta. S. L. B.

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