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FIG MARIGOLD

A popular name applied to the genus Mesembry- ANTHEMUM, which see.

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FORGET-ME-NOT

(Myosotis. Nat. Ord. Boraginacese).About forty species of Myosotis have been described, mostly with blue, rose, or white flowers, and are annual or perennial. Several of the latter are grown and treated as biennials. They are sown in the open on a finely prepared seed-bed in June or July, transplanted into lines to give them more room, and transferred to beds in October. Old plants are also allowed to ripen seeds, and the self-sown seedlings treated as above. If potted up, then they will bloom in the greenhouse during the winter. Some Suitable Sorts.A number of splendid varieties have been raised, and those mentioned below are varieties of Myosotis alpestris, M. dissittflora, and M. sylvatica. Azure Blue.A variety of Myosotis alpestris, producing deep sky-blue flowers from June to August. Height, 4-9 ins. Barrs Rosy Gem.A variety of Myosotis sylvatica, producing rose flowers from April to June. It forms compact bushes 10 ins. high. Jewel.A variety of Myosotis sylvatica, giving bright sky-blue flowers from April to June. It makes spreading bushes that cover the ground, and its height is 9 ins. Pillar Forget-me-not (Syns. Suttons Gem and Myosotis stricta). An erect or columnar strain of Myosotis sylvatica, giving blue, pink, and white flowers from April to June. Height, 6-9 ins. Ruth Fischer.A compact variety, giving large pale blue trusses of flowers from March to May. It is a splendid pot plant. Height, 6 ins. Star of Love.A hybrid between Myosotis dissitiflora and Myosotis sylvatica of dwarf compact habit, and producing large bright blue flowers from April to August. It is splendid for pot culture. Height, 5 ins. Suttons Bouquet.A free-flowering strain of compact habit derived from Myosotis sylvatica. Its blue, pink, and white flowers are produced from April to June, and its height is 8 ins. Suttons Perfection.An attractive strain of Myosotis sylvatica, producing large bright blue, rose, or white double flowers from April to June. Height, 9-10 ins. Suttons Royal Blue.An early robust form of Myosotis sylvatica, producing large deep indigo flowers from April to June, in sprays suitable for cutting. Height, 12 ins. Triumph.Avigorous early flowering variety of Myosotis sylvatica, that makes a splendid pot plant to flower at Christmas. Grown outside, its bright sky-blue flowers are given from March to May, and its height is 9 ins. Victoria.A variety of Myosotis alpestris, producing large azure-blue flowers from June to August. Height, 4-9 ins. WhiteLady.Avariety of Myosotis sylvatica, producing white flowers with a small yellow eye in April and May. Height, 10 ins.J. F. New Variety. Souvenir of William Walton.This bears extra large, bright blue flowers, and is a variety with a future. Seealso WaterGarden : PLANTS FOR THE.

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FUMARIA

(Fumitory. Nat. Ord. Papaveraceae). Most of the plants known as Fumitories are now included in other genera such as CoryDALIS and Dicentra, upon each of which separate articles are devoted. The species retained are hardy annuals and hardy annual climbing plants, merely requiring to be sown where they are to bloom in good garden soil. The best of the first are F. densiflora, F. officinalis (the Common Fumitory), and F. spicata, while F. capreolata (Syn. F. media of some authorities) is the best climber. All bear pale pink flowers in July, and average 1-4 ft. in height.

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FIGWORT

(Scrophularia. Nat. Ord. Scrophulariacese). The genus Scrophularia is a small and not very important one, containing mostly hardy herbaceous perennial plants of easy culture. These thrive in ordinary light loam in a sunny or lightly shaded site, and may be propagated by seeds sown in the usual way in the summer, or by division of the roots in the autumn or spring, which latter period is the best time for planting. What to Grow.Only a few species can be described here, and for others reference to larger works must be made : Scrophularia aquatica variegata (Water Betony).This may be used in the wild or water garden on account of the leafage. The flowers (produced in July) are an unattractive brown purple, and the plants grow about i yd. in height. S. chrysantha.This bears golden-yellow flowers from April to June, and grows about 2 ft. high. S. nodosa (Great Pilewort). This bears scarlet flowers in July, and grows about 2 ft. high. Si vernalis.This is a yellow May flowering biennial species growing about 2 ft. high.

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FOXGLOVE

(Digitalis. Nat. Ord. Scrophulariaceas).Some eighteen species of biennial and perennial Foxgloves are known, though comparatively few of them are grown to any extent. The Common Foxglove (Digitalis purpurea) is a well-known woodland plant, and is thus useful for the wild garden, for shady borders, and for margins of shrub borders. It is a plant of decided medicinal value, and reference should be made to our article on Medicinal Herbs for further particulars. Biennial Border Species.The four sorts described below are exceedingly useful, but the second is the most showy. They may all be raised from seeds sown in an open or half-shady part of the garden in April and May, but it is advisable to thin out or transplant the seedlings when quite small to get large plants for beds and borders. Digitalis alba.This bears white spotted or spotless flowers from June to September, and grows 3-S ft. high. This sort is available in many colours, and the flowers, which resemble Gloxinias on account of the large spots upon them, are produced from July to September, on plants 3-5 ft. high. D. monstrosa.This sort may be had in various charming colours, and its large bell-shaped top flower borne from July to September is distinctly attractive. Its height is 3-5 ft. D. purpurea (Common Foxglove). This is a well-known purple sort flowering from July to September, and growing 3-5 ft. high. Perennial Border Species.These are of the easiest culture in any good garden soil. They merely require to be kept clean by hoeing the beds and borders. Most of them may be increased by division of the roots in the autumn or spring, but all can be reared in quantity from seeds. Most of the perennial sorts are curious and interesting, though not so showy as the common Foxglove. We recommend the following selection : Digitalis ambigua (Syns. D. grandi- -flora, Milleri, and ochroleuca).This bears large buff-yellow flowers, which may vary in their shades. The plant blooms in July and August, and grows 2-4 ft. high. D. dubia.A synonym for D. media, which see. D. ferruginea (Syn. D. aurea). This short-lived perennial bears very numerous small rusty brown flowers in July and August, on plants 4-6 ft. high. D. laciniata.This sort bears small yellow flowers in June and July, and grows 1-2 ft. high. D. lanata.This sort bears brownish- white or grey flowers, with a white or pale purple beardless lip, 340 from June to August. Its height is 2-3 ft. D. lutea.This bears numerous light yellow flowers in July and August, and grows 2 ft. high. D. mariana.This bears pretty rose flowers from June to August, and grows \ ft. high. D. media.(Syns. D. duhia and D. minor).This bears large pale purple flowers in June and July. Height, 6-9 ins. D. orientalis.This species produces small white flowers in June and July, and grows i ft. high. D. Thapsi (Mullein Foxglove). This attractive sort bears large purple flowers with red spots within, from May to August, and grows 2-4 ft. high. D. iomentosa.This useful sort produces large red flowers from June to August, and grows 2-4 ft. high.-J. F. See also Digitalis, Medicinal Herbs, and Water Garden: Plants for the.

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FUMIGATING

The best method of destroying insect pests, such as Black Fly, Green Fly, Red Spider, and Thrips, on fruit trees and plants of all descriptions growing under glass, is by fumigating with smoke fumes. There are various compounds for vaporising which can be bought from any nurseryman ready for use. The old way of fumigating was chiefly with paper and rags soaked in tobacco juice and afterwards dried for use, as ordinary smoking tobacco was rather expensive for such purposes. If the system of using brown paper and rags is to be continued, material of the best quality should be used, as good plants may be injured or killed by the effect of the smoke fumes of bad material. The best quality of tobacco paper can be bought from any nurseryman ready for use. When to Fumigate. The best time to fumigate glasshouses or fram.es is a dull, damp, calm evening, as then the smoke will not escape so quickly. The foliage of the plants must be thoroughly dry at the time, otherwise it is sure to get scorched. The amount of smoke to be used depends on the class of plants that are to be fumigated, and whether the foliage is tender or hardy, and also if the plants are flowering. A gardener must judge for himself from the class of plants that he is going to fumigate as to whether they are tender subjects or not, and use the amount of smoke accordingly. Never fumigate in the morning, for the sun may come out very brightly at any moment, and the plants would be destroyed or very badly scorched on account of being in a house full of smoke fumes. Fumigators. To fumigate with the least trouble a proper fumigator should be purchased. These are manufactured in various kinds, and it would obviously be out of place to name any one make here. A satisfactory substitute frequently used by gardeners in large establishments for tobacco paper is a 9-inch flowerpot inverted upside down, a i-inch sand-riddle being put on the top of the pots, with a shovel of red coal cinders in the centre of the riddle. Then the tobacco paper is put over the cinders, and the whole covered with damp sphagnum moss. It is advisable to see that no flames appear, and to avoid this the moss must be kept damp by the use of a wateringcan with a fine rose. The writer always finds it best, after the houses are washed out in spring and plants sponged over, to give the house a slight fumigating occasionally as a preventive to the increase of insects. Ferneries must be fumigated very slightly, as the majority of ferns are very tender and easily scorched. On the day the house is to be fumigated refrain from damping paths or foliage. Greenhouses with plants in full flower must also be fumigated very lightly, otherwise the blooms will be spoiled, but fumigation may be as frequent as you like. A greenhouse containing but one variety of plants is, of course, much easier to fumigate than a house of mixed plants. Ihere are, as already mentioned, a great number of fumigators on the market at present, and they are all very good, though some are easier to use than others. The type with a glass-bottle lamp which burns methylated spirits through a round wick is the most satisfactory. There are also various compounds for vaporising obtainable in different sized bottles. The house to be fumigated will require to be measured in order to estimate the cubic feet of space. (See Arithmetic and Gardening.) This done, you can easily judge the quantity of the vaporising compound required, as directions are usually given on the bottle as to how much is required to fumigate each looo cubic feet. If carefully done, it will destroy all pests without doing the slightest injury to the most delicate foliage, flowers, or fruit. For destroying Red Spider, Thrips, etc., on vine foliage in a large vinery, use sulphur mixed in a can of buttermilk and worked into a fine paste. Take a whitewash brush and, having the hot-water pipes well heated, close all the vinerjf ventilators and doors, and then paint the pipes all over with the sulphur paste. A dull, damp evening is best to paint the pipes, in order to be certain that the sun will not com.e out brightly after putting the sulphur on the pipes. The sulphur will not require to be taken off the pipes the following day ; it can be left on, and will keep a nice sulphur fume all through the house each time the house is damped or closed.J. C.

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