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ERANTHIS

(Winter Aconite. Nat. Ord. RanunculaceBe).-A low growing, hardy, tuberous plant flowering very early. It thrives in any shady place, and is propagated by division in the winter. Eranthis hyemalis. Leaves in tufts from tubers. Flowers yellow surrounded by frill of leaflets. Soil loam. Flowering Period, January to March. Height, 3 ins.

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EUPHORBIA

(Spurge. Nat. Ord. Euphorbiacese).This is a large genus of stove shrubs, greenhouse shrubs, greenhouse perennials, hardy and stove annuals, hardy or halfhardy biennials, and hardy her baceous perennials. To describe the culture of any of the species save those in the last section is beyond our scope. None of the species are very desirable plants and some are very veeedy. The following are, however, probably the best known species : E. amygdaloides (Syn. E. sylvatica), the Wood Spurge ; E. Esula, TuRBiTH ) E. helioscopia, the Sun Spurge (see article on Weeds) ; E. Lathyrus, the Caper Spurge, and source of the well-known Capers useful for flavouring purposes ; E. Peplus, the Petty Spurge (see article on Weeds) ; and E. segetalis, the Corn Spurge. Perennial Border Species.These require the usual treatment bestowed on hardy herbaceous perennials and are of easy culture, thriving in ordinary soil in a sunny site. They may be propagated by seeds and root division in the usual way. The best species are : E. Cyfarissias, the Cypress Spurge (height, 12 ins.) ; E. hyberna, the Irish Spurge (height, 12 ins.) ; E. palusiris, the Marsh Spurge (height, 3-4 ft.) ; E. Paralias, the Seaside Spurge (height, 12 ins.) ; and E. portlandica, the Portland Spurge (height, 9 ins.). These may be used in the perennial and rock borders, also in the shrub border and wild garden, while E. palustris is useful in the drier portions of the water garden.

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EREMOSTACHYS

(Nat. Ord. Labiatse).This is a genus of hardy herbaceous plants for the perennial parterre. It is easily propagated by seeds or root-cuttings in the usual way, and thrives in ordinary light loam. The best species is E. laciniata, and its varieties flava and iberica are both worthy of inclusion. They bear yellow and purple flowers from July to August, and average 4-6 ft. in height.

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EURHODODENDRON

This is a group of Rhododendrons and is quite the largest. It includes most of the plants contained in our list of Rhododendron species. See article on Rhododendron.

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ECHINACEA

(Nat. Ord. Composite). This is a genus of hardy herbaceous perennials of very easy culture. It will succeed in ordinary light rich loam in most districts, and is not hard to propagate by summer-sown seeds or root division in March, at which latter period it may be successfully planted. It is a favourite plant with many exhibitors of hardy flowers. Echinacea purpurea is the best species. This bears red or reddishpurple flowers in August and September, on plants 2~4i ft- iii height.

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EREMURUS

(Nat. Ord. Liliaceae). This, known also as the Fox-tail Lily or Giant Asphodel, is a tall, stately plant, bearing a long spike of pink, white, or yellow flowers. It is hardy except in the coldest and bleakest parts of the United Kingdom. Of late years numerous hybrids have been raised. There is still a great opening for workers in this genus : first, to get more flowers open at once ; and secondly, to produce a greater range of colour. In warm summers seed is freely produced. Culture.The roots of Eremuri are like giant starfishes, so it is not easy to send them about. They need very careful handling, as they are easily broken. Plant them 6- 9 ins. deep in good rich, welldrained soil, any time from October to March. They need an annual top-dressing with light, rich compost, unless the plants are to deteriorate, as the new bud, which contains the flower spike, is produced on the top of the previous years bud. In cold localities a winter covering of leaf-mould or cocoanut fibre is essential. Eremuri are grateful for a little overhead shade, and if possible the young growth should be protected in spring on frosty nights, removing the covering in the daytime. Seed may be sown under glass as soon as it is ripe, the young seedlings being pricked out into a cold frame, where they should remain for a year, after which they can be transferred to an open border, though they should be protected from frost until well established. All Eremuri dislike being disturbed. What to Grow.Eremurus Bungei produces yellow flowers in spikes in July, and is 2-4 ft. high. PalUdus (primrose), and superbus (clear yellow), are two good sub-varieties. E, himalaicus bears white spikes from June onwards. Height, 6-8 ft. E. Olgae bears white flowers marked with red, or shaded pink, ERIGERON and blooms in late July ; its spike is 6 ft. high. Roseus is a charming rose-pink sub-variety, as also are Shelford (coppery-yellow), and St. Michael (buff and pmk). E. robustus produces immense spikes of rosy-pink flowers, and grows 8-10 ft. high. Elwesianus (pink) and elwesianus albus are two fine hybrids of this, full of charm, and of great vigour. All three flower in May and June. J. J. & E. T. E.

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EVENING PRIMROSE

(CEnothera. Nat. Ord. Onagraceas).The genus includes about a hundred annual, biennial, and perennial herbs, with yellow, rose, or purple flowers. The two biennial Evening Primroses described below may be sown in the open border in June or July, and thinned or transplanted to bloom the following summer. If allowed to ripen seeds they sow themselves, and the seedlings may be transplanted to suitable places. The Perennial Border Species succeed with the usual treatment bestowed on perennials. Annual Species.See Godetia. Biennial Species.These are somewhat numerous, but the two best are described below : (Enothera biennis.A pale yellow fragrant sort, blooming from June to September, and averaging about 2-4 ft. in height. CE. lamarckiana is frequently named CE. biennis var. grandiflora. CE. lamarckiana.Also pale yellow and fragrant. The flowers are large, and are produced from June to September. The height averages 2-s ft. Perennial Border Species.There is a large number of these. We have only space for a few of the best, and those named below are all quite hardy : CEnothera anisoloba.A white sort, changing to red, flowering in June, and averaging about half a yard in height. CE. Fraseri.A yellow sort similar 1 fhis (is I the (Common Evening Primrose.Editor. to CE. glauca, of which it is by some considered a variety. ffi. fruticosa.Probably the most popular of the perennial kinds. This sort bears yellow flowers from June to August, and averages 1-3 ft. in height. (E. glauca.This also is yellow, and blooms from June to August. Its height is 12 ft. (E. macrocarpa.This sort is often offered by nurserymen. It is synonymous with CE. missouriensis. See Rock Garden Species below. (E. Nuttalln.A white sort blooming in June and July. Height about I ft. CE. Sellowii.A yellow July blooming sort about 2 ft. high. CE. serotina.A yellow late-flowering sort coming in during September, averaging half a yard high. CE. speciosa.This, described below, is suitable for the perennial border. CE. Youngii.A yellow sort flowering from June to September, and averaging half a yard or more in height. Probably a form of CE. fruticosa. Rock Garden Species. Four species are suitable for the rock garden. They thrive in sunny, welldrained situations, and are propagated by seeds sown in gentle heat in March. CEnothera acaulis (Syn. CE. taraxacifolia). This produces Dandelionlike leaves in tufts. Flowers white, fading to pink, very large. Site sunny. Soil sandy loam. Flowering Period, June to September. Height, 6 ins. CE. caespitosa (Syns. CE. marginata and CE. eximia).A spreading species sending up tufts of hoary leaves. Flowers white, 4-6 ins. across, and sweetly scented. Site sunny. Soil sandy loam. Flowering Period, May to June. Height, 9 ins. CE. missouriensis (Syn. CE. macro- 300 carpa).Tufts of silky leaves and prostrate stems are produced by this plant. Flowers yellow. Site sunny. Soil sandy loam. Flowering Period, June to September. Height, 6 ins. or more. CE. speciosa.-A sub-shrubby species with slender wiry stems. Flowers pure white to rose, and sweetly scented. Site sunny. Soil sandy loam. Flowering Period, June to September. Height, 2 ft. See also GODETIA.

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